Why Some People are Against the Idea of Sharing Earth’s Resources Equitably

You would expect the idea of sharing earth’s resources equitably to be an idea that resonates with everyone. But as it turns out, there are huge numbers of people who are vehemently against that idea. There are people who actually find the very suggestion of sharing earth’s resources equitably to be a terrifying proposition. So, why is it that some people would be against this seemingly noble idea?

The answer to the question as to why some people are against the idea of sharing earth’s resources equitably is simple: there are some folks who know that they are hogging an unjustifiably big share of earth’s resources. Such folks therefore believe that if earth’s resources were to be shared equitably, they would end up being the losers: as a bit of what they hog would be taken and given to those who have nothing. These are folks used to living in luxury. These are the folks who can afford costly products, like, say, the highest rated over the ear headphones. To such folks, the idea of buying and using more modestly-priced products, such as the simple closed back on-ear headphones is unacceptable. They believe that they deserve ‘the best things in life’. Unfortunately, for them to do use the very best things in life, they end up depriving others of access to the rather limited earth’s resources. And knowing which side of their bread is buttered, they are (understandably) inclined to balk at any idea of sharing earth’s resources equitably.

A Radical Proposal On How to Share the Earth’s Natural Resources

Recently, while holding a discussion with a certain friend of mine who considers himself to be an intellectual, a rather radical proposal on how to share earth’s natural resources was made to me. The basic tenet of the proposal is this: that the earth’s natural resources should be shared equitably to all citizens of the world, and not just to the citizens of the countries where those resources happen to be found.

The basis for that proposal is easy to understand: given that the world belongs to all of us, as members of humanity, and the geographical borders we see are actually artificial. Thus, under this way of thinking, it makes no sense to have a scenario where only the people within the (artificial) geographical borders of the country where natural resources are found to be the only ones who benefit from those resources.

That radical proposal got me thinking about the possibility of one day having a truly borderless world. We already have such a world (or something resembling such a world) on the Internet. That is like where, for instance, any body from any country can, say, go to the Sbcglobal.net login page, or the Att.net email login page, and sign into his or her SBCGlobal email account there. That is ,with no consideration being made as to where they are, geographically: thanks to Internet’s governing bodies, such as W3C. Perhaps a point may come when this can be replicated in all spheres: including the sphere of sharing out the earth’s natural resources.