Earth Day Crusade

According to Winds or Star, a new kind of nautical captain is emerging to fight filth along River Canard. Similar to those who adopt stretches of highway and commit to cleaning them of litter, lovers of the outdoors are being commissioned to adopt pieces of a local watershed to help keep them clean.

“People kept saying over the years, ‘Why don’t you do something?’” Ron LaPointe, the owner of River Canard Canoe Co., said of guests whose enjoyment of an Essex County natural jewel was marred by the environmental disrespect shown by others.

Last year, LaPointe helped organize an Earth Day cleanup and the response was modest. This year, after posting photos on social media of the types of trash some messy folks leave behind, “we’ve had a big public response,” he said.

Even before the canoes are passed out April 22 with gloves and garbage bags for participants to haul trash out of the historic watershed, LaPointe said environmentally minded folks are volunteering as river captains, taking on the cleanup responsibility for portions of the Canard.

“The one-day thing is nice, but the real deal is people looking after sections of the river — instead of doing it all in one day, now we can coordinate,” he said. With two couples already commissioned, the captains take on leadership roles, he said, hopefully inspiring others to join the ongoing cleanup effort.

Bottles, cans, and grocery bags are among the mostly plastic garbage that litters many parts of the watershed. LaPointe, who blames “lazy people” for the mess, said it’s no different than in other natural areas in the county and city. In addition to wayward bits of trash, he said there are places along the Canard where vehicles stop to dump household wastes, including roof shingles, pool covers, and hockey nets.

Rain or shine on April 22, volunteers are asked to dress for the weather and gather at River Canard Canoe Co. (9350 Malden Rd.) at 1 p.m. Gloves and bags will be provided. Cleaners can tackle the shoreline or grab a canoe and attack the litter from the water, find liquor store.

This is how we can save Earth

Science fiction writer and ecologist Kim Stanley Robinson penned how we need to empty half the Earth of its humans in order to save the plant. However, his desired method is not by the Green Left’s usual tactic of reducing the population by 50 percent as it is potentially genocidal, find liquor store.

Instead, Robinson introduces a Promethean approach and those are:

  • To build giant, high-tech, efficient cities
  • Minimize the energy costs of transport
  • Concentrate waste treatment
  • Use vertical farms and other techniques to heal the “metabolic rift” where food is grown in one place and consumed somewhere else
  • Prevent the waste product from returning to the soil

 According to Boing Boing, Robinson shared, “So emptying half the Earth of its humans wouldn’t have to be imposed: it’s happening anyway. It would be more a matter of managing how we made the move, and what kind of arrangement we left behind. One important factor here would be to avoid extremes and absolutes of definition and practice, and any sense of idealistic purity. We are mongrel creatures on a mongrel planet, and we have to be flexible to survive.

So these emptied landscapes should not be called wilderness. Wilderness is a good idea in certain contexts, but these emptied lands would be working landscapes, commons perhaps, where pasturage and agriculture might still have a place. All those people in cities still need to eat, and food production requires land.

Even if we start growing food in vats, the feed stocks for those vats will come from the land. These mostly depopulated landscapes would be given over to new kinds of agriculture and pasturage, kinds that include habitat corridors where our fellow creatures can get around without being stopped by fences or killed by trains. This vision is one possible format for our survival on this planet.”