This is how we can save Earth

Science fiction writer and ecologist Kim Stanley Robinson penned how we need to empty half the Earth of its humans in order to save the plant. However, his desired method is not by the Green Left’s usual tactic of reducing the population by 50 percent as it is potentially genocidal, find liquor store.

Instead, Robinson introduces a Promethean approach and those are:

  • To build giant, high-tech, efficient cities
  • Minimize the energy costs of transport
  • Concentrate waste treatment
  • Use vertical farms and other techniques to heal the “metabolic rift” where food is grown in one place and consumed somewhere else
  • Prevent the waste product from returning to the soil

 According to Boing Boing, Robinson shared, “So emptying half the Earth of its humans wouldn’t have to be imposed: it’s happening anyway. It would be more a matter of managing how we made the move, and what kind of arrangement we left behind. One important factor here would be to avoid extremes and absolutes of definition and practice, and any sense of idealistic purity. We are mongrel creatures on a mongrel planet, and we have to be flexible to survive.

So these emptied landscapes should not be called wilderness. Wilderness is a good idea in certain contexts, but these emptied lands would be working landscapes, commons perhaps, where pasturage and agriculture might still have a place. All those people in cities still need to eat, and food production requires land.

Even if we start growing food in vats, the feed stocks for those vats will come from the land. These mostly depopulated landscapes would be given over to new kinds of agriculture and pasturage, kinds that include habitat corridors where our fellow creatures can get around without being stopped by fences or killed by trains. This vision is one possible format for our survival on this planet.”

Astronauts describe Earth from Space

Most people do not know what it is like to gaze at Earth from space but astronauts do. Has the view of the Pale Blue Dot ever crossed your mind? Nadia Drake recently wrote for the cover story of National Geographic’s new issue. The talented science writer shared the astronaut’s experience – seeing planet earth from the space, which changed them forever.

“You have got this planet beneath you, and a lot of what you see, especially during the day, does not necessarily point to a human presence. If you look at it on a geologic timescale, it is almost like we are this flimsy presence, and we really have to stick together as a human family to make sure we are a permanent presence on this planet and not just this blink of an eye,” Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti told Drake.

According to Boing Boing’s report, Nadia writes the emotional and lovely story:

For the bulk of human history, it’s been impossible to put Earth in cosmic perspective.

Bound by gravity and biology, we can’t easily step outside it, above it, or away from it. For most of us, Earth is inescapably larger than life. Even now, after nearly six decades of human spaceflight, precious few people have rocketed into orbit and seen the sun peeking out from behind that curved horizon. Since 1961, a mere 556 people have had this rarefied experience. Fewer, just 24, have watched Earth shrink in the distance, growing smaller and smaller until it was no larger than the face of a wristwatch. And only six have been completely alone behind the far side of the moon, cut off from a view of our planet as they sailed in an endlessly deep, star-studded sea…

It’s an inherently unnatural thing, spaceflight. After all, our physiology evolved specifically to succeed on this planet, not above it. Perhaps that’s why it can be difficult for astronauts to describe the experience of seeing Earth from space.